Modeling residential indoor concentrations of PM , NO , NO , and secondhand smoke in the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD (SPIROMICS) Air study.

TitleModeling residential indoor concentrations of PM , NO , NO , and secondhand smoke in the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD (SPIROMICS) Air study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsZusman M, Gassett AJ, Kirwa K, R Barr G, Cooper CB, Han MK, Kanner RE, Koehler K, Ortega VE, Rd RPaine, Paulin L, Pirozzi C, Rule A, Hansel NN, Kaufman JD
JournalIndoor Air
Volume31
Issue3
Pagination702-716
Date Published2021 05
ISSN1600-0668
KeywordsAdult, Air Pollutants, Air Pollution, Air Pollution, Indoor, Child, Cohort Studies, Environmental Exposure, Environmental Monitoring, Humans, Nitrogen Dioxide, Outcome Assessment, Health Care, Particulate Matter, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Research Design, Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract

Increased outdoor concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM ) and oxides of nitrogen (NO , NO ) are associated with respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity in adults and children. However, people spend most of their time indoors and this is particularly true for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Both outdoor and indoor air pollution may accelerate lung function loss in individuals with COPD, but it is not feasible to measure indoor pollutant concentrations in all participants in large cohort studies. We aimed to understand indoor exposures in a cohort of adults (SPIROMICS Air, the SubPopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study of Air pollution). We developed models for the entire cohort based on monitoring in a subset of homes, to predict mean 2-week-measured concentrations of PM , NO , NO , and nicotine, using home and behavioral questionnaire responses available in the full cohort. Models incorporating socioeconomic, meteorological, behavioral, and residential information together explained about 60% of the variation in indoor concentration of each pollutant. Cross-validated R for best indoor prediction models ranged from 0.43 (NO ) to 0.51 (NO ). Models based on questionnaire responses and estimated outdoor concentrations successfully explained most variation in indoor PM , NO , NO , and nicotine concentrations.

DOI10.1111/ina.12760
Alternate JournalIndoor Air
PubMed ID33037695
PubMed Central IDPMC8202242
Grant ListU24 HL141762 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23 ES025781 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
R01 ES023500 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900015C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RD838300 / EPA / EPA / United States
P30 ES007033 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL137880 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900018C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900013C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900014C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900019C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900016C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900017C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268200900020C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
MS156
Manuscript Full Title: 
Modeling residential indoor concentrations of PM , NO , NO , and secondhand smoke in the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD (SPIROMICS) Air study.
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published and Public